Trade Facilitation Guidance

24th October 2019
Paul Brooks

The  British Chambers of Commerce Brexit Hub  is a resource for businesses which  contains  essential  information on the implications of a No-Deal Brexit on importing and exporting goods.

We’ve compiled three E-Guides to help businesses understand the changes to Rules of Origin, Tariffs and Customs Declarations in the event of a No-Deal Brexit. They will help you learn what these concepts are, how they apply to you and what might be different.

Customs Declarations

Every year, more than £12 trillion worth of goods are traded amongst the world’s nations in nearly every language on the globe.
How do customs and regulatory authorities know where the goods are coming from or going to, in order to control the flow of goods, ensure the safety and security of the country and collect the correct duty?

Within the EU Single Market, goods can move freely between member states. However, a customs declaration is required to accompany goods entering or leaving the EU Single Market.

Find out more about Customs Declarations

Rules of origin

Every year, more than £12 trillion worth of goods are traded amongst the world’s nations in nearly every language on the globe.
How do customs and regulatory authorities know where the goods are coming from in order to impose the applicable duty or product standards?

“Origin” can be understood as the economic nationality of the goods. All internationally traded goods are required to have an origin when they are declared to customs at the point of import and at the time of export.

The question “where are your products from?” seems simple at first glance, but what does it really mean?

Is it where the goods were produced, or where they were shipped from? And if the goods were manufactured in several different countries, where is the cut-off point?

Rules of origin enable customs to answer similar questions and enable them to determine the origin of goods.

Find out more about Rules of origin

Tariffs

Every year, more than £12 trillion worth of goods are traded amongst the world’s nations in nearly every language on the globe.
How do customs and regulatory authorities know what is actually being imported into their country in order to impose the applicable duty or product standards?

The answer lies in the Harmonised Commodity Description and Coding System, also referred to as the Harmonised System or HS for short. The HS is a numeric-based coding system that allows us to uniformly classify all goods. It is currently used by over 200 countries and economies, to code more than 98% of all trade. The Harmonised System, upon which tariffs are based, is actually a convention managed and updated by the World Customs Organisation and its 183 members.

Find out more about Tariffs

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